Books published by University of Chicago Press

I Write What I Like

University of Chicago Press | September 1, 2002 | 216 pages
"The most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed." Like all of Steve Biko's writings, those words testify to the passion, courage, and keen insight that made him one of the most powerful figures in South Africa's struggle against apartheid. They also reflect his... More Info
$26.50

Political Theology

University of Chicago Press | March 30, 2020 | 70 pages
Foreword Tracy B. Strong p. vii Introduction George Schwab p. xxxvii Preface to the Second Edition (1934) p. 1 1 Definition of Sovereignty p. 5 2 The Problem of Sovereignty as the Problem of the Legal Form and of the Decision p. 16 3 Political Theology p. 36.  More Info
$27.50

The Torture Letters

University of Chicago Press | September 24, 2019 | 264 pages
Torture is an open secret in Chicago. Nobody in power wants to acknowledge this grim reality, but everyone knows it happens—and that the torturers are the police. Three to five new claims are submitted to the Torture Inquiry and Relief Commission of Illinois each week. Four hundred cases are... More Info

Nightmarch: Among India’s Revolutionary Guerrillas

University of Chicago Press | April 23, 2019 | 320 pages
Professor:  Vivian Solana
Course Codes:  ANTH 5708
Semester:  Winter-20
Anthropologist Alpa Shah found herself in an active platoon of Naxalites—one of the longest-running guerrilla insurgencies in the world. The only woman, and the only person without a weapon, she walked alongside the militants for seven nights across 150 miles of dense, hilly forests in eastern... More Info

Storycraft

University of Chicago Press | October 12, 2012 | 266 pages
Professor:  Moira Farr
Course Codes:  JOUR 4402
A former managing editor of the "Oregonian" who guided several Pulitzer Prize-winning narratives to publication shares guidelines for writers of nonfiction that encompass such topics as story theory, scene establishment, and preparing work for submission.  More Info

Storycraft

University of Chicago Press | October 12, 2012 | 266 pages
A former managing editor of the "Oregonian" who guided several Pulitzer Prize-winning narratives to publication shares guidelines for writers of nonfiction that encompass such topics as story theory, scene establishment, and preparing work for submission.  More Info

Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact

University of Chicago Press | August 15, 1981 | 203 pages
The sociological dimension of science is studied using the discovery of the Wasserman reaction and its accidental application as a test for syphilis as a basis, and examining the role of cultural conditioning and error in scientific discovery  More Info
$27.50

Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits

University of Chicago Press | October 7, 2019 | 336 pages
Who owns the past and the objects that physically connect us to history? And who has the right to decide this ownership, particularly when the objects are sacred or, in the case of skeletal remains, human? Is it the museums that care for the objects or the communities whose ancestors made them?... More Info
$21.00

The Great Derangement

University of Chicago Press | July 28, 2017 | 176 pages
Are we deranged? The acclaimed Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh argues that future generations may well think so. How else to explain our imaginative failure in the face of global warming? In his first major book of nonfiction since In an Antique Land, Ghosh examines our inability—at the level of... More Info

Saying Something

University of Chicago Press | March 15, 1997 | 265 pages
This fresh look at the neglected rhythm section in jazz ensembles shows that the improvisational interplay among drums, bass, and piano is just as innovative, complex, and spontaneous as the solo. Ingrid Monson juxtaposes musicians' talk and musical examples to ask how musicians go about "saying... More Info
$47.00

Foucault and Political Reason

University of Chicago Press | June 1, 1996 | 278 pages
Despite the enormous influence of Michel Foucault in gender studies, social theory, and cultural studies, his work has been relatively neglected in the study of politics. Although he never published a book on the state, in the late 1970s Foucault examined the technologies of power used to regulate... More Info

Versions of Academic Freedom

University of Chicago Press | October 23, 2014 | 163 pages
Advocates of academic freedom often view it as a variation of the right to free speech and an essential feature of democracy. Stanley Fish argues here for a narrower conception of academic freedom, one that does not grant academics a legal status different from other professionals. Providing a... More Info

Wherever the Sound Takes You

University of Chicago Press | April 12, 2019 | 244 pages
David Rowell is a professional journalist and an impassioned amateur musician. He’s spent decades behind a drum kit, pondering the musical relationship between equipment and emotion. In Wherever the Sound Takes You, he explores the essence of music’s meaning with a vast spectrum of players,... More Info

Choked

University of Chicago Press | April 26, 2019 | 298 pages
Nothing is as elemental, as essential to human life, as the air we breathe. Yet around the world, in rich countries and poor ones, it is quietly poisoning us. Air pollution prematurely kills seven million people every year, including more than one hundred thousand Americans. It is strongly linked... More Info

Down, Out, and Under Arrest

University of Chicago Press | April 6, 2018 | 345 pages
In his first year working in Los Angeles’s Skid Row, Forrest Stuart was stopped on the street by police fourteen times. Usually for doing little more than standing there. Juliette, a woman he met during that time, has been stopped by police well over one hundred times, arrested upward of sixty... More Info

On the Heels of Ignorance

University of Chicago Press | April 26, 2019 | 310 pages
Psychiatry has always aimed to peer deep into the human mind, daring to cast light on its darkest corners and untangle its thorniest knots, often invoking the latest medical science in doing so. But, as Owen Whooley’s sweeping new book tell us, the history of American psychiatry is really a... More Info

How We Became Our Data

University of Chicago Press | June 19, 2019 | 280 pages
We are now acutely aware, as if all of the sudden, that data matters enormously to how we live. How did information come to be so integral to what we can do? How did we become people who effortlessly present our lives in social media profiles and who are meticulously recorded in state surveillance... More Info

How Dogs Work

University of Chicago Press | April 22, 2019 | 224 pages
How well do we really know dogs? People may enjoy thinking about them as “man’s best friend,” but what actually drives the things they do? What is going on in their fur-covered heads as they look at us with their big, expressive eyes? Raymond Coppinger and Mark Feinstein know something about... More Info

The Death Gap

University of Chicago Press | March 19, 2019 | 240 pages
We hear plenty about the widening income gap between the rich and the poor in America and about the expanding distance separating the haves and the have-nots. But when detailing the many things that the poor have not, we often overlook the most critical—their health. The poor die sooner. Blacks... More Info
$36.50

Richard Rorty

University of Chicago Press | July 22, 2019 | 390 pages
On his death in 2007, Richard Rorty was heralded by the New York Times as “one of the world’s most influential contemporary thinkers.” Controversial on the left and the right for his critiques of objectivity and political radicalism, Rorty experienced a renown denied to all but a handful of... More Info