Books published by University of Chicago Press

Freedom Is an Endless Meeting

University of Chicago Press | May 1, 2004 | 295 pages
Freedom Is an Endless Meeting offers vivid portraits of American experiments in participatory democracy throughout the twentieth century. Drawing on meticulous research and more than one hundred interviews with activists, Francesca Polletta challenges the conventional wisdom that participatory... More Info

The Modernity Bluff

University of Chicago Press | June 20, 2012 | 318 pages
In Côte d’Ivoire, appearing modern is so important for success that many young men deplete their already meager resources to project an illusion of wealth in a fantastic display of Western imitation, spending far more than they can afford on brand name clothing, accessories, technology, and a... More Info

The Meaning of the Body

University of Chicago Press | November 15, 2008 | 308 pages
The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on... More Info
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Pressed for Time

University of Chicago Press | June 6, 2016 | 227 pages
The technologically tethered, iPhone-addicted figure is an image we can easily conjure. Most of us complain that there aren't enough hours in the day and too many e-mails in our thumb-accessible inboxes. This widespread perception that life is faster than it used to be is now ingrained in our... More Info

Moving Politics

University of Chicago Press | December 15, 2009 | 536 pages
In the late 1980s, after a decade spent engaged in more routine interest-group politics, thousands of lesbians and gay men responded to the AIDS crisis by defiantly and dramatically taking to the streets. But by the early 1990s, the organization they founded, ACT UP, was no more—even as the AIDS... More Info

The Post Card

University of Chicago Press | January 1, 1987 | 521 pages
Examines the philosophies of Socrates and Plato, Sigmund Freud's theory of psychoanalysis, and the nature of communication  More Info

China's Hidden Children

University of Chicago Press | March 28, 2016 | 224 pages
During the 1990s and early 2000s, China became the world s largest supplier of healthy, predominantly female, children for international adoption--a veritable diaspora of 120,000 girls. We in the west have come to believe that this situation was the result of China s One-Child Policy, combined with... More Info

Obsolescence

University of Chicago Press | February 12, 2016 | 208 pages
Things fall apart. But in his innovative, wide-ranging, and well-illustrated book, Daniel Abramson investigates the American definition of what falling apart entails. We build new buildings partly in response to demand, but even more because we believe that existing buildings are slowly becoming... More Info

Arendt and America

University of Chicago Press | October 20, 2015 | 416 pages
Books about Hannah Arendt abound; but there are none that deal with Arendt's 30-year time in America, at least not until now. Richard King's study of Arendt and America will be quick to establish itself as one of the most significant publications in intellectual history in recent years. Arendt's... More Info

Papi

University of Chicago Press | March 22, 2016 | 176 pages
Papi tells a story in the voice of an eight year old girl waiting in Santo Domingo for her father to return from New York to lavish her with gifts and the glory of his fame. Things don't go according to plan.  More Info

Nothing

University of Chicago Press | October 16, 2015 | 289 pages
Though contemporary European philosophy and critical theory have long had a robust engagement with Christianity, there has been no similar engagement with Buddhism—a surprising lack, given Buddhism's global reach and obvious affinities with much of Continental philosophy. This volume fills that... More Info

About the Beginning of the Hermeneutics of the Self

University of Chicago Press | December 29, 2015 | 152 pages
In 1980, Michel Foucault began a vast project of research on the relationship between subjectivity and truth, an examination of conscience, confession, and truth-telling that would become a crucial feature of his life-long work on the relationship between knowledge, power, and the self. The... More Info

The Great Prince Died

University of Chicago Press | May 13, 2015 | 416 pages
On August 20, 1940, Marxist philosopher, politician, and revolutionary Leon Trotsky was attacked with an ice axe in his home in Coyoacán, Mexico. He died the next day. In The Great Prince Died, Bernard Wolfe offers his lyrical, fictionalized account of Trotsky’s assassination as witnessed... More Info

Geographies of Nineteenth-Century Science

University of Chicago Press | July 15, 2011 | 526 pages
In Geographies of Nineteenth-Century Science, David N. Livingstone and Charles W. J. Withers gather essays that deftly navigate the spaces of science in this significant period and reveal how each is embedded in wider systems of meaning, authority, and identity. Chapters from a distinguished range... More Info

Science in the Marketplace

University of Chicago Press | October 22, 2007 | 432 pages
The nineteenth century was an age of transformation in science, when scientists were rewarded for their startling new discoveries with increased social status and authority. But it was also a time when ordinary people from across the social spectrum were given the opportunity to participate in... More Info

The View of Life

University of Chicago Press | June 19, 2015 | 240 pages
Published in 1918, The View of Life is Georg Simmel’s final work. Famously deemed “the brightest man in Europe” by George Santayana, Simmel addressed diverse topics across his essayistic writings, which influenced scholars in aesthetics, epistemology, and sociology. Nevertheless, certain core... More Info
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House of Debt

University of Chicago Press | April 23, 2015 | 227 pages
The Great American Recession resulted in the loss of eight million jobs between 2007 and 2009. More than four million homes were lost to foreclosures. Is it a coincidence that the United States witnessed a dramatic rise in household debt in the years before the recession—that the total amount of... More Info

Morality for Humans

University of Chicago Press | March 25, 2014 | 273 pages
What is the difference between right and wrong? This is no easy question to answer, yet we constantly try to make it so, frequently appealing to some hidden cache of cut-and-dried absolutes, whether drawn from God, universal reason, or societal authority. Combining cognitive science with a... More Info

More Than Cool Reason

University of Chicago Press | February 15, 1989 | 230 pages
"The authors restore metaphor to our lives by showing us that it's never gone away. We've merely been taught to talk as if it had: as though weather maps were more 'real' than the breath of autumn; as though, for that matter, Reason was really 'cool.' What we're saying whenever we say is a theme... More Info

The Romantic Machine

University of Chicago Press | November 27, 2014 | 467 pages
In the years immediately following Napoleon’s defeat, French thinkers in all fields set their minds to the problem of how to recover from the long upheavals that had been set into motion by the French Revolution. Many challenged the Enlightenment’s emphasis on mechanics and questioned the... More Info

Feminism in Twentieth-Century Science, Technology, and Medicine

University of Chicago Press | November 1, 2001 | 264 pages
What useful changes has feminism brought to science? Feminists have enjoyed success in their efforts to open many fields to women as participants. But the effects of feminism have not been restricted to altering employment and professional opportunities for women. The essays in this volume explore... More Info

Accident Prone

University of Chicago Press | June 15, 2009 | 336 pages
Technology demands uniformity from human beings who encounter it. People encountering technology, however, differ from one another. Thinkers in the early twentieth century, observing the awful consequences of interactions between humans and machines—death by automobiles or dismemberment by... More Info

Jan Patocka

University of Chicago Press | August 15, 1989 | 386 pages
One of the most important Central European philosophers of this century, Jan Patocka (1907-77) was a student and heir of Masaryk, Husserl, and Heidegger as well as a philosopher and historian of ideas in his own right. Patocka, who was forced to retire prematurely from Charles University in Prague... More Info

Top 40 Democracy

University of Chicago Press | October 20, 2014 | 312 pages
If you drive into any American city with the car stereo blasting, you’ll undoubtedly find radio stations representing R&B/hip-hop, country, Top 40, adult contemporary, rock, and Latin, each playing hit after hit within that musical format. American music has created an array of rival... More Info

Baroque Science

University of Chicago Press | July 21, 2014 | 352 pages
In Baroque Science, Ofer Gal and Raz Chen-Morris present a radically new perspective on the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century. Instead of celebrating the triumph of reason and rationality, they study the paradoxes and anxieties that stemmed from the New Science and the intellectual... More Info

Versions of Academic Freedom

University of Chicago Press | October 17, 2014 | 177 pages
Advocates of academic freedom often view it as a variation of the right to free speech and an essential feature of democracy. Stanley Fish argues here for a narrower conception of academic freedom, one that does not grant academics a legal status different from other professionals. Providing a... More Info

The Hoarders

University of Chicago Press | October 9, 2014 | 197 pages
The verb “declutter” has not yet made it into the Oxford English Dictionary, but its ever-increasing usage suggests that it’s only a matter of time. Articles containing tips and tricks on how to get organized cover magazine pages and pop up in TV programs and commercials, while clutter... More Info

Packaged Pleasures

University of Chicago Press | September 1, 2014 | 336 pages
From the candy bar to the cigarette, records to roller coasters, a technological revolution during the last quarter of the nineteenth century precipitated a colossal shift in human consumption and sensual experience. Food, drink, and many other consumer goods came to be mass-produced, bottled,... More Info

Lies, Passions, and Illusions

University of Chicago Press | September 29, 2014 | 125 pages
François Furet needs little introduction. Widely considered one of the leading historians of the French Revolution, he was a maverick for his time, shining a critical light on the entrenched Marxist interpretations that prevailed during the mid-twentieth century.  More Info

The Making of Romantic Love

University of Chicago Press | August 30, 2012 | 449 pages
In the twelfth century, the Catholic Church attempted a thoroughgoing reform of marriage and sexual behavior aimed at eradicating sexual desire from Christian lives. Seeking a refuge from the very serious condemnations of the Church and relying on a courtly culture that was already preoccupied with... More Info

Collateral Knowledge

University of Chicago Press | May 1, 2011 | 295 pages
Who are the agents of financial regulation? Is good (or bad) financial governance merely the work of legislators and regulators? Here Annelise Riles argues that financial governance is made not just through top-down laws and policies but also through the daily use of mundane legal techniques such... More Info

The history

University Of Chicago Press | January 1, 1987 | 699 pages
Describes the background of Herodotus and his times, and shares his account and observations on the war between the Greeks and Persians  More Info

Stung!

University of Chicago Press | May 7, 2013 | 454 pages
Our oceans are becoming increasingly inhospitable to life—growing toxicity and rising temperatures coupled with overfishing have led many marine species to the brink of collapse. And yet there is one creature that is thriving in this seasick environment: the beautiful, dangerous, and now... More Info

Science on American Television

University of Chicago Press | December 21, 2012 | 306 pages
As television emerged as a major cultural and economic force, many imagined that the medium would enhance civic education for topics like science. And, indeed, television soon offered a breathtaking banquet of scientific images and ideas—both factual and fictional. Mr. Wizard performed... More Info

Law in Everyday Japan

University of Chicago Press | August 15, 2005 | 279 pages
Lawsuits are rare events in most people's lives. High-stakes cases are even less commonplace. Why is it, then, that scholarship about the Japanese legal system has focused almost exclusively on epic court battles, large-scale social issues, and corporate governance? Mark D. West's Law in Everyday... More Info

A Neighborhood That Never Changes

University of Chicago Press | February 1, 2010 | 352 pages
Newcomers to older neighborhoods are usually perceived as destructive, tearing down everything that made the place special and attractive. But as A Neighborhood That Never Changes demonstrates, many gentrifiers seek to preserve the authentic local flavor of their new homes, rather than ruthlessly... More Info

Reading History Sideways

University of Chicago Press | November 6, 2013 | 344 pages
European and American scholars from the eighteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries thought that all societies passed through the same developmental stages, from primitive to advanced. Implicit in this developmental paradigm—one that has affected generations of thought on societal... More Info

Wild Hope

University of Chicago Press | July 9, 2012 | 255 pages
Offers stories of successful conservation around the world, introducing the heroes and foot soldiers, and sharing the new ideas they are generating about how to make conservation work.  More Info

Seaweeds

University of Chicago Press | June 5, 2013 | 305 pages
Until recently, seaweed for most Americans was nothing but a nuisance, clinging to us as we swim in the ocean and stinking up the beach as it rots in the sun. With the ever-growing popularity of sushi restaurants across the country, however, seaweed is becoming a substantial part of our total food... More Info

Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1772-1844

University Of Chicago Press | February 15, 2004 | 302 pages
A professor at twenty-one and member of the Napoleon's Egyptian expedition at twenty-six, Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire was a man of one idea, which he formulated when he was twenty-four. Nature, he thought, had formed all living beings with one single plan. This was a revolutionary idea—and one... More Info

The Magical State

University Of Chicago Press | November 10, 1997 | 447 pages
In 1935, after the death of dictator General Juan Vicente Gomez, Venezuela consolidated its position as the world's major oil exporter and began to establish what today is South America's longest-lasting democratic regime. Endowed with the power of state oil wealth, successive presidents appeared... More Info

Fear of Food

University of Chicago Press | April 8, 2013 | 232 pages
There may be no greater source of anxiety for Americans today than the question of what to eat and drink. Are eggs the perfect protein, or are they cholesterol bombs? Is red wine good for my heart or bad for my liver? Will pesticides, additives, and processed foods kill me? Here with some very rare... More Info

Darwin Deleted

University of Chicago Press | March 22, 2013 | 328 pages
The ideas and terminology of Darwinism are so pervasive these days that it seems impossible to avoid them, let alone imagine a world without them. But in this remarkable rethinking of scientific history, Peter J. Bowler does just that. He asks: What if Charles Darwin had not returned from the... More Info

Recalculating

University of Chicago Press | March 13, 2013 | 201 pages
Long anticipated, Recalculating is Charles Bernstein’s first full-length collection of new poems in seven years. As a result of this lengthy time under construction, the scope, scale, and stylistic variation of the poems far surpasses Bernstein’s previous work. Together, the poems of... More Info

How Animals Grieve

University of Chicago Press | March 21, 2013 | 201 pages
From the time of our earliest childhood encounters with animals, we casually ascribe familiar emotions to them. But scientists have long cautioned against such anthropomorphizing, arguing that it limits our ability to truly comprehend the lives of other creatures. Recently, however, things have... More Info

Image and Logic

University Of Chicago Press | October 1, 1997 | 955 pages
"I want to get at the blown glass of the early cloud chambers and the oozing noodles of wet nuclear emulsion; to the resounding crack of a high-voltage spark arcing across a high-tension chamber and leaving the lab stinking of ozone; to the silent, darkened room, with row after row of scanners... More Info

Before Homosexuality in the Arab-Islamic World, 1500-1800

University of Chicago Press | March 2, 2009 | 224 pages
Attitudes toward homosexuality in the pre-modern Arab-Islamic world are commonly depicted as schizophrenic—visible and tolerated on one hand, prohibited by Islam on the other. Khaled El-Rouayheb argues that this apparent paradox is based on the anachronistic assumption that homosexuality is a... More Info

Queering the Underworld

University of Chicago Press | May 15, 2009 | 272 pages
At the start of the twentieth century, tales of “how the other half lives” experienced a surge in popularity. People looking to go slumming without leaving home turned to these narratives for spectacular revelations of the underworld and sordid details about the deviants who populated it. In... More Info

Before the Closet

University of Chicago Press | May 1, 2000 | 380 pages
Allen J. Frantzen challenges the long accepted view that the early Middle Ages tolerated and even fostered same-sex relations and that intolerance of homosexuality developed only late in the medieval period. Frantzen shows that in early medieval Europe, the Church did not tolerate same-sex acts, in... More Info

Improper Advances

University of Chicago Press | September 15, 1993 | 238 pages
Why do men rape women? This is a question for which there are many political, psychological, and sociological answers, but few historical ones. Improper Advances is one of the first books to explore the history of sexual violence in any country. A study of women, men, and sexual crime in rural and... More Info

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