Books published by University of Chicago Press

$22.95

A Stricken Field

University of Chicago Press | September 15, 2011 | 328 pages
Professor:  Whiting, Patricia
Course Codes:  ENGL 4115 and 5900
Semester:  Summer-2019
Martha Gellhorn was one of the first—and most widely read—female war correspondents of the twentieth century. She is best known for her fearless reporting in Europe before and during WWII and for her brief marriage to Ernest Hemingway, but she was also an acclaimed novelist. In 1938, before the... More Info
$32.50

Wherever the Sound Takes You

University of Chicago Press | April 12, 2019 | 244 pages
David Rowell is a professional journalist and an impassioned amateur musician. He’s spent decades behind a drum kit, pondering the musical relationship between equipment and emotion. In Wherever the Sound Takes You, he explores the essence of music’s meaning with a vast spectrum of players,... More Info
$25.95

How Dogs Work

University of Chicago Press | April 22, 2019 | 224 pages
How well do we really know dogs? People may enjoy thinking about them as “man’s best friend,” but what actually drives the things they do? What is going on in their fur-covered heads as they look at us with their big, expressive eyes? Raymond Coppinger and Mark Feinstein know something about... More Info
$43.50

On the Heels of Ignorance

University of Chicago Press | April 26, 2019 | 310 pages
Psychiatry has always aimed to peer deep into the human mind, daring to cast light on its darkest corners and untangle its thorniest knots, often invoking the latest medical science in doing so. But, as Owen Whooley’s sweeping new book tell us, the history of American psychiatry is really a... More Info
$27.50

Down, Out, and Under Arrest

University of Chicago Press | April 6, 2018 | 345 pages
In his first year working in Los Angeles’s Skid Row, Forrest Stuart was stopped on the street by police fourteen times. Usually for doing little more than standing there. Juliette, a woman he met during that time, has been stopped by police well over one hundred times, arrested upward of sixty... More Info
$39.95

Choked

University of Chicago Press | April 26, 2019 | 298 pages
Nothing is as elemental, as essential to human life, as the air we breathe. Yet around the world, in rich countries and poor ones, it is quietly poisoning us. Air pollution prematurely kills seven million people every year, including more than one hundred thousand Americans. It is strongly linked... More Info
$25.25

The Death Gap

University of Chicago Press | March 19, 2019 | 240 pages
We hear plenty about the widening income gap between the rich and the poor in America and about the expanding distance separating the haves and the have-nots. But when detailing the many things that the poor have not, we often overlook the most critical—their health. The poor die sooner. Blacks... More Info
$42.00

Human Predicaments

University of Chicago Press | March 8, 2019 | 272 pages
In his latest book, esteemed philosopher John Kekes draws on anthropology, history, and literature in order to help us cope with the common predicaments that plague us as we try to take control of our lives. In each chapter he offers fascinating new ways of thinking about a particular problem that... More Info

The Victorian Eye

University of Chicago Press | November 1, 2008 | 392 pages
During the nineteenth century, Britain became the first gaslit society, with electric lighting arriving in 1878. At the same time, the British government significantly expanded its power to observe and monitor its subjects. How did such enormous changes in the way people saw and were seen affect... More Info

Science in Translation

University of Chicago Press | January 1, 2000 | 325 pages
In this innovative work, Scott L. Montgomery explores the diverse roles that translation has played in the development of science from antiquity to the present—from the Arabic translations of Greek and Latin texts whose reintroduction to Europe was crucial to the Renaissance, to the origin and... More Info

The Wounded Storyteller

University of Chicago Press | August 28, 2013 | 260 pages
Since it was first published in 1995, The Wounded Storyteller has occupied a unique place in the body of work on illness. Both the collective portrait of a so-called “remission society” of those who suffer from some type of illness or disability and a cogent analysis of their stories within a... More Info

The Human Condition

University of Chicago Press | December 1, 1998 | 369 pages
A work of striking originality bursting with unexpected insights, The Human Condition is in many respects more relevant now than when it first appeared in 1958. In her study of the state of modern humanity, Hannah Arendt considers humankind from the perspective of the actions of which it is... More Info

Prisoners of Shangri-La

University of Chicago Press | February 27, 2018 | 312 pages
To the Western imagination, Tibet evokes exoticism, mysticism, and wonder: a fabled land removed from the grinding onslaught of modernity, spiritually endowed with all that the West has lost. Originally published in 1998, Prisoners of Shangri-La provided the first cultural history of the strange... More Info

The Merits of Women

University of Chicago Press | March 8, 2018 | 129 pages
You would as well look for blood in a corpse as for the least shred of decency in a man . . . Without help from their wives, men are just like unlit lamps . . . Just think of them as an unreliable clock that tells you it’s ten o’clock when it’s in fact barely two . . . A man without a woman... More Info

Interacting with Print

University of Chicago Press | January 26, 2018 | 399 pages
A thorough rethinking of a field deserves to take a shape that is in itself new. Interacting with Print delivers on this premise, reworking the history of print through a unique effort in authorial collaboration. The book itself is not a typical monograph—rather, it is a “multigraph,” the... More Info

Imagining Extinction

University of Chicago Press | August 10, 2016 | 288 pages
As the extinction of species accelerates and more species become endangered, activists, filmmakers, writers, and artists have responded to bring this global crisis to the attention of the public. Until now, there has been no study of the frameworks that shape these narratives and images, or of the... More Info

The Dominion of the Dead

University of Chicago Press | May 27, 2005 | 222 pages
How do the living maintain relations to the dead? Why do we bury people when they die? And what is at stake when we do? In The Dominion of the Dead, Robert Pogue Harrison considers the supreme importance of these questions to Western civilization, exploring the many places where the dead cohabit... More Info

Selected Poems from Les Fleurs Du Mal

University of Chicago Press | March 15, 2000 | 248 pages
Translates seventy-three poems from Baudelaire's famous collection, presenting the French originals and translations in facing-page format.  More Info

Making Jet Engines in World War II

University of Chicago Press | October 10, 2016 | 361 pages
"Making Jet Engines" presents a radical re-interpretation of the early history of the jet engine in Germany, Britain, and the United States and, through this, sets out a new account of the central features of twentieth-century invention. Hermione Giffard, without invoking foresight or conservative... More Info

China's Hidden Children

University of Chicago Press | September 29, 2017 | 224 pages
In the thirty-five years since China instituted its One-Child Policy, 120,000 children—mostly girls—have left China through international adoption, including 85,000 to the United States. It’s generally assumed that this diaspora is the result of China’s approach to population control, but... More Info

The Red Atlas

University of Chicago Press | October 17, 2017 | 248 pages
Many know that the Soviet Military gathered incredible information during the Cold War, but revealed in these pages is evidence that they secretly, and largely successfully, mapped the entire world. In addition to city maps of Oxford, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Shanghai, the Soviets had street level... More Info
$21.00

The Great Derangement

University of Chicago Press | July 28, 2017 | 176 pages
Are we deranged? The acclaimed Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh argues that future generations may well think so. How else to explain our imaginative failure in the face of global warming? In his first major book of nonfiction since In an Antique Land, Ghosh examines our inability—at the level of... More Info

Kindly Inquisitors

University of Chicago Press | January 23, 2014 | 214 pages
“A liberal society stands on the proposition that we should all take seriously the idea that we might be wrong. This means we must place no one, including ourselves, beyond the reach of criticism; it means that we must allow people to err, even where the error offends and upsets, as it often... More Info

Growing Each Other Up

University of Chicago Press | September 29, 2016 | 287 pages
From growing their children, parents grow themselves, learning the lessons their children teach. “Growing up”, then, is as much a developmental process of parenthood as it is of childhood. While countless books have been written about the challenges of parenting, nearly all of them position the... More Info

Supersizing Urban America

University of Chicago Press | March 15, 2017 | 265 pages
More than one-third of adults in the United States are obese. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that there are over 112,000 obesity-related deaths annually, and for many years, the government has waged a very public war on the problem. Former Surgeon General Richard Carmona... More Info

What Is a Dog?

University of Chicago Press | March 7, 2017 | 257 pages
Of the world’s dogs, less than two hundred million are pets, living with humans who provide food, shelter, squeaky toys, and fashionable sweaters. But roaming the planet are four times as many dogs who are their own masters—neighborhood dogs, dump dogs, mountain dogs. They are dogs, not... More Info

Heidegger

University of Chicago Press | June 16, 2016 | 266 pages
The present work is the fourth volume of the twenty projected volumes of our "Seminars of Jacques Derrida Series" edited by Geoffrey Bennington and Peggy Kamuf. The work derives from an early phase of Derrida s teaching at the Ecole Normale Superieur at Ulm from 1964-5. In this course Derrida... More Info

Biopower

University of Chicago Press | January 4, 2016 | 386 pages
Michel Foucault’s notion of “biopower” has been a highly fertile concept in recent theory, influencing thinkers worldwide across a variety of disciplines and concerns. In The History of Sexuality: An Introduction, Foucault famously employed the term to describe “a power bent on generating... More Info

Freedom Is an Endless Meeting

University of Chicago Press | May 1, 2004 | 295 pages
Freedom Is an Endless Meeting offers vivid portraits of American experiments in participatory democracy throughout the twentieth century. Drawing on meticulous research and more than one hundred interviews with activists, Francesca Polletta challenges the conventional wisdom that participatory... More Info

The Modernity Bluff

University of Chicago Press | June 20, 2012 | 318 pages
In Côte d’Ivoire, appearing modern is so important for success that many young men deplete their already meager resources to project an illusion of wealth in a fantastic display of Western imitation, spending far more than they can afford on brand name clothing, accessories, technology, and a... More Info

The Meaning of the Body

University of Chicago Press | November 15, 2008 | 308 pages
The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on... More Info

Pressed for Time

University of Chicago Press | June 6, 2016 | 227 pages
The technologically tethered, iPhone-addicted figure is an image we can easily conjure. Most of us complain that there aren't enough hours in the day and too many e-mails in our thumb-accessible inboxes. This widespread perception that life is faster than it used to be is now ingrained in our... More Info

Moving Politics

University of Chicago Press | December 15, 2009 | 536 pages
In the late 1980s, after a decade spent engaged in more routine interest-group politics, thousands of lesbians and gay men responded to the AIDS crisis by defiantly and dramatically taking to the streets. But by the early 1990s, the organization they founded, ACT UP, was no more—even as the AIDS... More Info

The Post Card

University of Chicago Press | January 1, 1987 | 521 pages
Examines the philosophies of Socrates and Plato, Sigmund Freud's theory of psychoanalysis, and the nature of communication  More Info

China's Hidden Children

University of Chicago Press | March 28, 2016 | 224 pages
During the 1990s and early 2000s, China became the world s largest supplier of healthy, predominantly female, children for international adoption--a veritable diaspora of 120,000 girls. We in the west have come to believe that this situation was the result of China s One-Child Policy, combined with... More Info

Obsolescence

University of Chicago Press | February 12, 2016 | 208 pages
Things fall apart. But in his innovative, wide-ranging, and well-illustrated book, Daniel Abramson investigates the American definition of what falling apart entails. We build new buildings partly in response to demand, but even more because we believe that existing buildings are slowly becoming... More Info

Arendt and America

University of Chicago Press | October 20, 2015 | 416 pages
Books about Hannah Arendt abound; but there are none that deal with Arendt's 30-year time in America, at least not until now. Richard King's study of Arendt and America will be quick to establish itself as one of the most significant publications in intellectual history in recent years. Arendt's... More Info

Papi

University of Chicago Press | March 22, 2016 | 176 pages
Papi tells a story in the voice of an eight year old girl waiting in Santo Domingo for her father to return from New York to lavish her with gifts and the glory of his fame. Things don't go according to plan.  More Info

Nothing

University of Chicago Press | October 16, 2015 | 289 pages
Though contemporary European philosophy and critical theory have long had a robust engagement with Christianity, there has been no similar engagement with Buddhism—a surprising lack, given Buddhism's global reach and obvious affinities with much of Continental philosophy. This volume fills that... More Info

About the Beginning of the Hermeneutics of the Self

University of Chicago Press | December 29, 2015 | 152 pages
In 1980, Michel Foucault began a vast project of research on the relationship between subjectivity and truth, an examination of conscience, confession, and truth-telling that would become a crucial feature of his life-long work on the relationship between knowledge, power, and the self. The... More Info

The Great Prince Died

University of Chicago Press | May 13, 2015 | 416 pages
On August 20, 1940, Marxist philosopher, politician, and revolutionary Leon Trotsky was attacked with an ice axe in his home in Coyoacán, Mexico. He died the next day. In The Great Prince Died, Bernard Wolfe offers his lyrical, fictionalized account of Trotsky’s assassination as witnessed... More Info

Geographies of Nineteenth-Century Science

University of Chicago Press | July 15, 2011 | 526 pages
In Geographies of Nineteenth-Century Science, David N. Livingstone and Charles W. J. Withers gather essays that deftly navigate the spaces of science in this significant period and reveal how each is embedded in wider systems of meaning, authority, and identity. Chapters from a distinguished range... More Info

Science in the Marketplace

University of Chicago Press | October 22, 2007 | 432 pages
The nineteenth century was an age of transformation in science, when scientists were rewarded for their startling new discoveries with increased social status and authority. But it was also a time when ordinary people from across the social spectrum were given the opportunity to participate in... More Info

The View of Life

University of Chicago Press | June 19, 2015 | 240 pages
Published in 1918, The View of Life is Georg Simmel’s final work. Famously deemed “the brightest man in Europe” by George Santayana, Simmel addressed diverse topics across his essayistic writings, which influenced scholars in aesthetics, epistemology, and sociology. Nevertheless, certain core... More Info

House of Debt

University of Chicago Press | April 23, 2015 | 227 pages
The Great American Recession resulted in the loss of eight million jobs between 2007 and 2009. More than four million homes were lost to foreclosures. Is it a coincidence that the United States witnessed a dramatic rise in household debt in the years before the recession—that the total amount of... More Info

Morality for Humans

University of Chicago Press | March 25, 2014 | 273 pages
What is the difference between right and wrong? This is no easy question to answer, yet we constantly try to make it so, frequently appealing to some hidden cache of cut-and-dried absolutes, whether drawn from God, universal reason, or societal authority. Combining cognitive science with a... More Info

More Than Cool Reason

University of Chicago Press | February 15, 1989 | 230 pages
"The authors restore metaphor to our lives by showing us that it's never gone away. We've merely been taught to talk as if it had: as though weather maps were more 'real' than the breath of autumn; as though, for that matter, Reason was really 'cool.' What we're saying whenever we say is a theme... More Info

The Romantic Machine

University of Chicago Press | November 27, 2014 | 467 pages
In the years immediately following Napoleon’s defeat, French thinkers in all fields set their minds to the problem of how to recover from the long upheavals that had been set into motion by the French Revolution. Many challenged the Enlightenment’s emphasis on mechanics and questioned the... More Info

Feminism in Twentieth-Century Science, Technology, and Medicine

University of Chicago Press | November 1, 2001 | 264 pages
What useful changes has feminism brought to science? Feminists have enjoyed success in their efforts to open many fields to women as participants. But the effects of feminism have not been restricted to altering employment and professional opportunities for women. The essays in this volume explore... More Info

Accident Prone

University of Chicago Press | June 15, 2009 | 336 pages
Technology demands uniformity from human beings who encounter it. People encountering technology, however, differ from one another. Thinkers in the early twentieth century, observing the awful consequences of interactions between humans and machines—death by automobiles or dismemberment by... More Info

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