Category: Unusual histories

The Design of Everyday Things

Basic Books (AZ) | November 5, 2013 | 384 pages
Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door. The fault, argues this ingenious?even liberating?book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the... More Info

The Lost

Harper Perennial | November 12, 2013 | 672 pages
No summary available.

Marijuana Is Safer

Chelsea Green Publishing | August 17, 2017 | 224 pages
Examines the cannabis plant and its effects on users, debunks common myths, and provides talking points for marijuana policy reform advocates, in an updated edition that covers the substance's legalization in Colorado in 2012.  More Info

The H Factor of Personality

Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press | November 1, 2012 | 201 pages
The "H"; in the H factor stands for "Honesty-Humility,"; and it's one of only six basic dimensions of personality. People who have high levels of H are sincere and modest; people who have low levels are deceitful and pretentious. It isn't intuitively obvious that traits of honesty and humility go... More Info

Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting

W. W. Norton | November 11, 2013 | 320 pages
A collection of poignant essays about the transformative power of knitting by twenty-seven extraordinary writers.  More Info

This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage

Harper | November 5, 2013 | 320 pages
No summary available.

Four Colors Suffice: How the Map Problem Was Solved (Revised Color Edition)

Princeton University Press | November 4, 2013 | 240 pages
On October 23, 1852, Professor Augustus De Morgan wrote a letter to a colleague, unaware that he was launching one of the most famous mathematical conundrums in history--one that would confound thousands of puzzlers for more than a century. This is the amazing story of how the "map problem" was... More Info

The Little Hummingbird

Greystone Books | April 27, 2010 | 32 pages
A retelling of an ancient Quechuan fable follows the hummingbird as she makes a valiant effort to put out the fire threatening her forest home, teaching her woodland companions that doing something is better than doing nothing at all.  More Info

1001 Ideas That Changed the Way We Think

Atria Books | October 29, 2013 | 960 pages
An elegant addition to the successful “1001” series—a comprehensive, chronological guide to the most important thoughts from the finest minds of the past 3,000 years. From Democracy to Cultural Revolution, Courtly Love to Survival of the Fittest, and Kant’s Enlightenment to the Oedipus... More Info

One Minute to Midnight

Random House LLC | August 17, 2017 | 426 pages
A study of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis chronicles the standoff between the U.S. and the Soviet Union over the placement of missiles in Cuba, analyzing the events and personalities involved to reveal how close the world came to all-out nuclear war.  More Info

Among the Islands

HarperPerennial | October 22, 2013 | 256 pages
A Globe and Mail Best Book of 2012 Twenty-five years ago, a young Australian museum curator named Tim Flannery set out to research the fauna of the Pacific Islands. Starting with a survey of one of the most inaccessible islands in Melanesia, the young scientist found himself ghost whispering, snake... More Info

Last Night at the Viper Room

It Books | October 22, 2013 | 288 pages
Last Night at the Viper Room by Gavin Edwards has descriptive copy which is not yet available from the Publisher.  More Info

Romantic Geography

October 1, 2013 | 184 pages
Geography is useful, indeed necessary, to survival. Everyone must know where to find food, water, and a place of rest, and, in the modern world, all must make an effort to make the Earth—our home—habitable. But much present-day geography lacks drama, with its maps and statistics, descriptions... More Info

Pablo Picasso

Bluewater Productions | April 1, 2013 | 40 pages
Involved in expressionism, cubism and surrealism, Picasso is the outstanding painter during the first half of the 20th century. Innumerable publications to his person have appeared. In contrast to them this short guide delivers an overview of life and work of the controversial genius in not so many... More Info

Milestones of Art: Frida Kahlo: Viva Mexico

Bluewater Production Incorporated | January 15, 2013 | 40 pages
Frida Kahlo called herself "Daughter of the Mexican Revolution”. At the age of 18 she had a terrible traffic accident with the result of great pains for the remaining 28 years of her life. She created round about 70 self-portraits. She did painting when she felt sick and had to lay in bed. When... More Info

Milestones of Art: Vincent Van Gogh: The Chase of Ravens

Bluewater Productions | April 15, 2013 | 40 pages
Vincent van Gogh becomes only 37 years old. Only the last 10 years of his life he is engaged in painting. Restlessly and exhausting he travels through the Netherlands, Belgium, Great Britain and France. Together with his colleagues Cezanne, Toulouse-Lautrec and Gauguin he is regarded today as one... More Info

The Men Who United the States

Harper | October 15, 2013 | 480 pages
No summary available.

Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat

Basic Books (AZ) | October 8, 2013 | 336 pages
Since prehistory, humans have braved sharp knives, fire, and grindstones to transform raw ingredients into something delicious—or at least edible. Tools shape what we eat, but they have also transformed how we consume, and how we think about, our food. In Consider the Fork, award-winning food... More Info

Granny is My Wingma

No summary available.

Still Writing

Atlantic Monthly Press | October 1, 2013 | 256 pages
?Everything I know about life, I learned from the daily practice of sitting down to write.” From the best-selling author of Devotion and Slow Motion comes a witty, heartfelt, and practical look at the exhilarating and challenging process of storytelling. At once a memoir, meditation on the... More Info

David and Goliath

Little, Brown | October 1, 2013 | 304 pages
Malcolm Gladwell, the #1 bestselling author of The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, and What the Dog Saw, offers his most provocative--and dazzling--book yet. We all know that underdogs can win-that's what the David versus Goliath legend tells us, and we've seen it with our own eyes. Or have we? In... More Info

Almost True Confessions

William Morrow Paperbacks | October 1, 2013 | 336 pages
Reporting for a job with well-known, but reclusive author, freelance copyeditor, Rannie Bookman, discovers the writer murdered, naked and tied to her bed in the second mystery from the author of Dangerous Admissions. Original. 40,000 first printing.  More Info

The Weed Runners

Chicago Review Press | September 1, 2013 | 224 pages
"A behind-the-scenes look at the quasi-legal business of medical marijuana and the people who risk their liberty to push the limits of this grand experiment"--  More Info

House Inside the Waves

Dundurn | August 17, 2017 | 276 pages
In an era of packaged paradises and cyber surfers, Taylors mid-life blues seduced him into recapturing his youthful romance with surfing.  More Info

Catastrophe

HarperPress | September 24, 2013 | 400 pages
A magisterial chronicle of the calamity that crippled Europe in 1914.  More Info

Rock, Paper, Fire

October 15, 2013 | 285 pages
In the past few years, as writing about the outdoors has moved from a minority genre into the mainstream, climbers, adventurers, and environmental activists have gathered at the Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies to explore their passions through writing. Now, their most inspired work is... More Info

Slow Reading in a Hurried Age

Belknap Press | October 8, 2013 | 330 pages
Reading, David Mikics says, should not be drudgery, and not mere information-gathering or escape either, but a way to live life at a higher pitch. Slow Reading in a Hurried Age is a practical guide for anyone who yearns for a more meaningful, satisfying reading experience, as well as sharper... More Info

How to Lose a War at Sea

William Morrow Paperbacks | September 24, 2013 | 368 pages
From the Spanish Armada to the modern age of aircraft carriers, history is littered with horribly bad military ideas on the open seas. With more than 35 chapters of incredible military disasters, both famous (infamous) and obscure, 'How to Lose a War at Sea' is chock full of trivia, history, and... More Info

Three Squares: The Invention of the American Meal

Basic Books (AZ) | September 10, 2013 | 304 pages
We are what we eat, as the saying goes?but we are also how we eat, and when, and where. Our eating habits reveal as much about our national identity as the food on our plates, as food historian Abigail Carroll vividly demonstrates in Three Squares. Reaching back to colonial America, when settlers... More Info

A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming

September 10, 2013 | 288 pages
No summary available.

The Black Rhinos of Namibia

August 20, 2013 | 288 pages
An award-winning author visits the Namib Desert with a group of former poachers, now conservationists, in search of endangered black rhinos that were saved from extinction by human intervention and cutting-edge conservation techniques. 20,000 first printing.  More Info

A Geography of Blood

Greystone Books | October 15, 2013 | 224 pages
When Candace Savage and her partner buy a house near the Saskatchewan-Montana border, her naturalist's instinct propels her to explore the area. She takes pleasure in the Wild West setting, discovering hidden back roads, dinosaur skeletons at the discovery center, and fossils in the dust-dry hills.... More Info

Why Community, Culture and Karma Matter in Business

September 17, 2013 | 288 pages
The award-winning CEO of G Adventures shares the dynamic business practices of the world’s leading adventure travel company In 2010, Bruce Poon Tip shut down his human resources department. After building G Adventures from his garage into the world’s largest adventure travel company with over... More Info

Harlem Nocturne

Basic Civitas Books | September 10, 2013 | 256 pages
"In Harlem Nocturne, eminent scholar Farah Jasmine Griffin tells the stories of three black female artists who emerged during this period of unprecedented openness, flourishing professionally while also making enormous political strides for their fellow women and African Americans. Novelist Ann... More Info

Miss Anne in Harlem

Harper | September 10, 2013 | 576 pages
Celebrated scholar Carla Kaplan’s cultural biography, Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance, focuses on white women, collectively called “Miss Anne,” who became Harlem Renaissance insiders. The 1920s in New York City was a time of freedom, experimentation, and... More Info

The Allure of the Archives

September 1, 2013 | 150 pages
Arlette Farge’s Le Goût de l’archive is widely regarded as a historiographical classic. While combing through two-hundred-year-old judicial records from the Archives of the Bastille, historian Farge was struck by the extraordinarily intimate portrayal they provided of the lives of the poor in... More Info

Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die

William Morrow Paperbacks | August 27, 2013 | 192 pages
In 1971 Nashville, Willie Nelson, after a life-changing experience, decides to do things his own way, reinventing himself and resurrecting his career, in this wonderful holiday tale that recounts Willie's colorful adventures and is told in his unique voice. 125,000 first printing.  More Info

1493

Random House Digital, Inc. | August 17, 2017 | 690 pages
Reveals how the voyages of Columbus reintroduced plants and animals that had been separated millions of years earlier, documenting how the ensuing exchange of flora and fauna between Eurasia and the Americas fostered a European rise, decimated imperial China and rendered Manila and Mexico City the... More Info

The Noodle Narratives

August 30, 2013 | 212 pages
Tasty, convenient, and cheap, instant noodles are one of the most remarkable industrial foods ever. Consumed around the world by millions, they appeal to young and old, affluent and impoverished alike. The authors examine the history, manufacturing, marketing, and consumption of instant noodles. By... More Info

And Then There Were Nuns

Greystone Books | May 14, 2013 | 304 pages
With humor and opinions aplenty, a woman embarks on an unconventional quest to see if she is meant to be a nun. Just as Jane Christmas decides to enter a convent in mid-life to find out whether she is ?nun material”, her long-term partner Colin, suddenly springs a marriage proposal on her.... More Info

The United States of Paranoia

Harper | August 20, 2013 | 352 pages
Includes bibliographical references and index.  More Info

Where the Heart Beats

Penguin Group USA | July 30, 2013 | 496 pages
A first book by a Zen Buddhist practitioner and leading art critic assesses the influence of Zen Buddhism on the work of composer John Cage, exploring the ways in which Zen transformed Cage's troubled psyche, his relationship with partner Merce Cunningham and his often indefinable music. 20,000... More Info

Fifty Railroads That Changed the Course of History

Firefly Books Limited | July 23, 2013 | 224 pages
Fifty Railroads that Changed the Course of History, is a handsome, illustrated survey of the most important historical and contemporary railway lines around the world.  More Info

To Timbuktu for a Haircut

Dundurn PressLtd | July 27, 2013 | 256 pages
With the fabled city of Timbuktu as his goal, author Rick Antonson began a month-long trek. His initial plan? To get a haircut. The second edition of this important book outlines the volatile political situations in Timbuktu following the spring 2012 military coup in Mali and the subsequent capture... More Info

Ready for a Brand New Beat: How "Dancing in the Street" Became the Anthem for a Changing America

Riverhead Books (Hardcover) | July 11, 2013 | 288 pages
Can a song change a nation? In 1964, Marvin Gaye, record producer William “Mickey” Stevenson, and Motown songwriter Ivy Jo Hunter wrote “Dancing in the Street.” The song was recorded at Motown's Hitsville USA Studio by Martha and the Vandellas, with lead singer Martha Reeves arranging her... More Info

Safar Voyage

Douglas & McIntyre | April 30, 2013 | 128 pages
Contemporary art is now inclusive of geographies that until recently had escaped the attention of Western art centres such as Paris and New York. A vast area commonly referred to as the Middle East constitutes part of an ?emerging geography” whose art has finally become globally visible. The... More Info

A Year of Living Generously

Douglas & McIntyre | April 1, 2011 | 360 pages
Can one person make a difference? When we write a cheque to a charity, or run in a fundraiser, or volunteer at a food bank, we're part of the solution, aren't we? Lawrence Scanlan went on a year long odyssey to discover the answers and uncover the true face of philanthropy ? its players, its... More Info

The House of All Sorts

Douglas & McIntyre Limited | August 17, 2017 | 196 pages
Before winning recognition as an artist and writer, Emily Carr served as landlady to an apartment building where she bred English sheep dogs to supplement a meager income. A collection of stories about those hard-working days, The House of All Sorts features vividly portrayed tenants who frequently... More Info

What to Eat?

Portobello Books | May 3, 2013 | 448 pages
Deciding what to eat is no longer a simple matter of instinct and appetite. Every choice we make about the food we put on our plates is complicated. Is meat good or bad for me? Is buying local always best? Is organic worth it? WHAT TO EAT? asks all these questions and more: some are specific, going... More Info

Ecologies of Affect

Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press | May 30, 2011 | 346 pages
This collection of essays actively and consistently engages the reader in understanding how place images, and the attempts to build communities, are fundamentally tied to and revolve around themselves.  More Info

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