Category: Media, science & technology

The World Made Meme

MIT Press | September 30, 2016 | 272 pages
How memetic media -- aggregate texts that are collectively created, circulated, and transformed -- become a part of public conversations that shape broader cultural debates.  More Info

The Content Trap

Random House | April 26, 2016 | 464 pages
For readers of "The Innovator s Dilemma" comes an incisive new approach to one of the key questions of our time how to thrive rather than be destroyed by digital transformation from Harvard Business School Professor of Strategy Bharat Anand. Companies everywhere face two major challenges today:... More Info


Mit Press | September 2, 2016 | 328 pages
In the year 2014, Google fired a shot heard all the way to Detroit. Google's newest driverless car had no steering wheel and no brakes. The message was clear: cars of the future will be born fully autonomous, with no human driver needed. In the coming decade, self-driving cars will hit the streets,... More Info

Men, Machines, and Modern Times

Mit Press | August 19, 2016 | 344 pages
People have had trouble adapting to new technology ever since (perhaps) the inventor of the wheel had to explain that a wheelbarrow could carry more than a person. This little book by a celebrated MIT professor -- the fiftieth anniversary edition of a classic -- describes how we learn to live and... More Info

Streaming, Sharing, Stealing

MIT Press | August 5, 2016 | 232 pages
How big data is transforming the creative industries, and how those industries can use lessons from Netflix, Amazon, and Apple to fight back.  More Info

Life on the Edge

Broadway Books | July 26, 2016 | 368 pages
New York Times Bestseller and an Amazon Best Science Book of 2015 Life is the most extraordinary phenomenon in the known universe; but how did it come to be? Even in an age of cloning and artificial biology, the remarkable truth remains: nobody has ever made anything living entirely out of dead... More Info

Big Science

July 26, 2016 | 528 pages
"The birth of Big Science can be traced to Berkeley, California, nearly nine decades ago, when a resourceful young scientist with a talent for physics and an even greater talent for promotion pondered his new invention and declared, 'I'm going to be famous!' Ernest Orlando Lawrence's cyclotron... More Info

Big Farms Make Big Flu

Monthly Review Press | June 1, 2016 | 400 pages
Thanks to breakthroughs in production and food science, agribusiness has been able to devise new ways to grow more food and get it more places more quickly. There is no shortage of news items on hundreds of thousands of hybrid poultry – each animal genetically identical to the next – packed... More Info

The Wave

Random House Digital, Inc. | May 31, 2011 | 432 pages
A riveting and rollicking tour-de-force about the terrifying power of nature's most deadly phenomena — colossal waves — and the scientists and super surfers who are obsessed with them. The New York Timesbestselling author ofThe Devil's Teethprobes the dramatic convergence of baffling gargantuan... More Info

Pressed for Time

University of Chicago Press | June 6, 2016 | 227 pages
The technologically tethered, iPhone-addicted figure is an image we can easily conjure. Most of us complain that there aren't enough hours in the day and too many e-mails in our thumb-accessible inboxes. This widespread perception that life is faster than it used to be is now ingrained in our... More Info


Oxford University Press | May 26, 2016 | 202 pages
The applications of Artificial Intelligence lie all around us; in our homes, schools and offices, in our cinemas, in art galleries and - not least - on the Internet. The results of Artificial Intelligence have been invaluable to biologists, psychologists, and linguists in helping to understand the... More Info


Macmillan | February 16, 2016 | 288 pages
"From the author of The Fever, a wide-ranging inquiry into the origins of pandemics Interweaving history, original reportage, and personal narrative, Pandemic explores the origins of epidemics, drawing parallels between the story of cholera-one of history's most disruptive and deadly pathogens-and... More Info

Sorting the Beef from the Bull

Bloomsbury Sigma | April 26, 2016 | 320 pages
Horse meat in our burgers, melamine in our infant formula, artificial colors in our fish and fruit--as our urban lifestyle takes us farther away from our food sources, there are increasing opportunities for dishonesty, duplicity, and profit-making shortcuts. Food adulteration, motivated by money,... More Info

The Gene

Scribner | May 17, 2016 | 592 pages
From the Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Emperor of All Maladies—a magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to “read” and “write” our own genetic information? The extraordinary... More Info

Magic and Loss

Simon & Schuster | January 26, 2016 | 256 pages
Just as Susan Sontag did for photography and Marshall McLuhan did for television, Virginia Heffernan (called one of the “best living writers of English prose”) reveals the logic and aesthetics behind the Internet. Since its inception, the Internet has morphed from merely an extension of... More Info

The Shallows

W. W. Norton & Company | October 24, 2016 | 276 pages
Expanding on an article that appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, the best-selling author of The Big Switch discusses the intellectual and cultural consequences of the Internet, and how it may be transforming our neural pathways for the worse.  More Info


Harper Perennial | February 23, 2016 | 304 pages
The newest addition to John Brockman’s series explores life itself, bringing together the world’s leading biologists, geneticists, and evolutionary theorists—including Richard Dawkins, Edward O. Wilson, J. Craig Venter, and Freeman Dyson. Scientists’ understanding of life is... More Info


February 9, 2016 | 256 pages
How on Earth did we fix upon our twenty-six letters, what do they really mean, and how did we come to write them down in the first place? Michael Rosen takes you on an unforgettable adventure through the history of the alphabet in twenty-six vivid chapters, fizzing with personal anecdotes and... More Info

Most Wanted Particle

March 8, 2016 | 320 pages
The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large... More Info

The Soul of an Octopus

Atria Books | May 17, 2016 | 256 pages
Another New York Times bestseller from the author of The Good Good Pig, this “fascinating…touching…informative…entertaining” (Daily Beast) book explores the emotional and physical world of the octopus—a surprisingly complex, intelligent, and spirited creature—and the remarkable... More Info

The Next Species

Simon & Schuster | March 29, 2016 | 336 pages
“Simultaneously sobering and exhilarating, Michael Tennesen’s wide-ranging survey of disasters highlights both life’s fragility and its metamorphosing persistence” (Booklist) and describes what life on earth could look like after the next mass extinction. A growing number of scientists... More Info

Terms of Service

Harper Perennial | March 8, 2016 | 448 pages
Social networking has grown into a staple of modern society, but its continued evolution is becoming increasingly detrimental to our lives. Shifts in communication and privacy are affecting us more than we realize or understand.  More Info

Tales from Both Sides of the Brain

Ecco | January 26, 2016 | 448 pages
Michael S. Gazzaniga, one of the most important neuroscientists of the twentieth century, gives us an exciting behind-the-scenes look at his seminal work on that unlikely couple, the right and left brain. Foreword by Steven Pinker. In the mid-twentieth century, Michael S. Gazzaniga, “the father... More Info

Brain vs. Machine

Harper Perennial | October 6, 2015 | 528 pages
As the world becomes ever more dominated by technology, John Brockman’s latest addition to the acclaimed and bestselling “Edge Question Series” asks more than 175 leading scientists, philosophers, and artists: What do you think about machines that think? The development of artificial... More Info

Humanity in a Creative Universe

Oxford University Press | March 1, 2016 | 312 pages
Much of Stuart Kauffman's work in the philosophy of evolutionary biology has centered on the question of what he calls "prestatability" in evolution: that is, whether or not science can precisely predict the future development of biological features in organisms, using a singular "FinalTheory" of... More Info

The Second Machine Age

W. W. Norton | May 4, 2015 | 320 pages
A pair of technology experts describe how humans will have to keep pace with machines in order to become prosperous in the future and identify strategies and policies for business and individuals to use to combine digital processing power with human ingenuity.  More Info


Simon and Schuster | March 22, 2016 | 304 pages
It has been called "the great destroyer" and "the evil." The Pentagon refers to it as "the pervasive menace." Itdestroys cars, fells bridges, sinks ships, sparks house fires, and nearly brought down the Statue of Liberty. Rust costs America more than $400 billion per year-more than all other... More Info

100 Million Years Of Food

HarperCollins Publishers | February 2, 2016 | 320 pages
In the vein of Jared Diamond and Michael Pollan, a fascinating new exploration of what we eat and how we live, and the health consequences of denying our complicated evolutionary history with food.  More Info

The Teenage Brain

Collins | January 26, 2016 | 384 pages
In this instant New York Times bestseller, now available in paperback, renowned neurologist Dr. Frances E. Jensen offers a revolutionary look at the brains of teenagers, dispelling myths and “offer[ing] support and a way for parents to understand and relate to their own soon-to-be-adult... More Info


Simon and Schuster | November 3, 2015 | 224 pages
The hosts of the popular "Citizen Radio" podcast reveal how the mainstream media gets it left, right, and utterly wrong on issues ranging from feminism to gun control, climate change to class war, and foreign policy to net neutrality.  More Info

The Idealist

Simon and Schuster | January 12, 2016 | 352 pages
A smart, lively history of the Internet free culture movement and its larger effects on society - and the life and shocking suicide of Aaron Swartz, a founding developer of Reddit and Creative Commons-from Slate correspondent Justin Peters. Aaron Swartz was a zealous young advocate for the free... More Info


Simon and Schuster | December 1, 2015 | 256 pages
"In their first-ever book, Mitchell Moffit and Greg Brown, the [guys] behind the wildly popular YouTube channel AsapSCIENCE, answer your burning questions, explaining the true science of how things work."--P. 4 of cover.  More Info


Simon and Schuster | February 23, 2016 | 336 pages
“A visionary roadmap for people who believe they can change the world—and invaluable advice about bringing together the partners and technologies to help them do it.” —President Bill Clinton A radical, how-to guide for using exponential technologies, moonshot thinking, and crowd-powered... More Info

The Innovators

Simon & Schuster | October 6, 2015 | 560 pages
Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson’s New York Times bestselling and critically acclaimed The Innovators is a “riveting, propulsive, and at times deeply moving” (The Atlantic) story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. What were the talents... More Info

Reclaiming Conversation

Penguin Press HC | October 1, 2015 | 448 pages
Renowned media scholar Sherry Turkle investigates how a flight from conversation undermines our relationships, creativity, and productivity --and why reclaiming face-to-face conversation can help us regain lost ground. We live in a technological universe in which we are always communicating. And... More Info

The Digital Mind

Portfolio (Hardcover) | September 15, 2015 | 256 pages
A leading behavioral economist reveals the tools that will improve our decision making on screens Office workers spend the majority of their waking hours staring at screens. Unfortunately, few of us are aware of the visual biases and behavioral patterns that influence our thinking when we're on our... More Info

Chasing the Scream

Bloomsbury USA | March 1, 2016 | 400 pages
It is now one hundred years since drugs were first banned in the United States. On the eve of this centenary, journalist Johann Hari set off on an epic three-year, thirty-thousand-mile journey into the war on drugs. What he found is that more and more people all over the world have begun to... More Info

Trees on Mars

October 15, 2015 | 320 pages
What is it like to live in a society utterly focused on what is going to happen next? In Trees on Mars: Our Obsession with the Future, cultural critic and indie entrepreneur Hal Niedzviecki asks how and when we started believing we could and should "create the future," arguing that the short-term... More Info

Access to Information and Social Justice

Arbeiter Ring | October 30, 2015 | 224 pages
Access to Information and Social Justice combines the political and the practical aspects of Access to Information (ATI) research into a single volume in order to reinvigorate critical social science, investigative journalism, and social activism in Canada. Not only does it expose some of the most... More Info

The Forbidden Fuel

Bison Books | October 24, 2016 | 274 pages
The Forbidden Fuel is the definitive history of alcohol fuel, describing in colorful detail the emergence of alcohol fuel in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the political and economic forces behind its popularity, opposition, and eventual growth. In 1982, when The Forbidden Fuel was... More Info

In a Different Key

Crown Publishing Group (NY) | January 19, 2016 | 688 pages
Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family's odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of... More Info

Bad News

Random House Canada | January 12, 2016 | 288 pages
Author of the acclaimed "Stringer, " praised by Jon Stewart as "a remarkable book about the lives of people in the Congo," Anjan Sundaram returns to Africa for a piercing look at Rwanda, a country still caught in political and social unrest years after the genocide that shocked the world. "Bad... More Info

Mass Disruption

Random House Canada | October 13, 2015 | 320 pages
Drawing on his thirty years in newspapers, the former editor-in-chief of" The Globe and Mail "examines the crisis of serious journalism in the digital era, and searches for ways the invaluable tradition can thrive in a radically changed future. John Stackhouse entered the newspaper business in a... More Info

The Evolution of Everything

Harper | November 3, 2015 | 368 pages
The New York Times bestselling author of The Rational Optimist and Genome returns with a fascinating, brilliant argument for evolution that definitively dispels a dangerous, widespread myth: that we can command and control our world. The Evolution of Everything is about bottom-up order and its... More Info

Newton's Apple and Other Myths about Science

Harvard University Press | November 4, 2015 | 290 pages
A falling apple inspired the law of gravity or so the story goes. Is it true? Perhaps not. But why do such stories endure as explanations of how science happens? "Newton s Apple and Other Myths about Science" brushes away popular misconceptions to provide a clearer picture of scientific... More Info


Mit Press | August 21, 2015 | 144 pages
With Obfuscation, Finn Brunton and Helen Nissenbaum mean to start a revolution. They are calling us not to the barricades but to our computers, offering us ways to fight today's pervasive digital surveillance -- the collection of our data by governments, corporations, advertisers, and hackers. To... More Info

Becoming Fluent

MIT Press | August 7, 2015 | 248 pages
Adults who want to learn a foreign language are often discouraged because they believe they cannot acquire a language as easily as children. Once they begin to learn a language, adults may be further discouraged when they find the methods used to teach children don't seem to work for them. What is... More Info

The Neural Basis of Free Will

Mit Press | August 28, 2015 | 472 pages
The issues of mental causation, consciousness, and free will have vexed philosophers since Plato. In this book, Peter Tse examines these unresolved issues from a neuroscientific perspective. In contrast with philosophers who use logic rather than data to argue whether mental causation or... More Info

Digital Methods

Mit Press | August 28, 2015 | 280 pages
In Digital Methods, Richard Rogers proposes a methodological outlook for social and cultural scholarly research on the Web that seeks to move Internet research beyond the study of online culture. It is not a toolkit for Internet research, or operating instructions for a software package; it deals... More Info