Category: Media, science & technology

The Influencing Machine

W. W. Norton & Company | May 7, 2012 | 192 pages
Gladstone pens a visionary and opinionated work of graphic nonfiction on the media and its discontents. 192 pp.  More Info

A Short History of Nearly Everything

Anchor Canada | September 14, 2004 | 560 pages
One of the world's most beloved and bestselling writers takes his ultimate journey -- into the most intriguing and intractable questions that science seeks to answer. In A Walk in the Woods, Bill Bryson trekked the Appalachian Trail -- well, most of it. In In A Sunburned Country, he confronted some... More Info
$38.95

We Are Data

NYU Press | May 2, 2017 | 320 pages
What identity means in an algorithmic age: how it works, how our lives are controlled by it, and how we can resist it Algorithms are everywhere, organizing the near limitless data that exists in our world. Derived from our every search, like, click, and purchase, algorithms determine the news we... More Info
$27.00

The Gene

Scribner | May 16, 2017 | 608 pages
The #1 New York Times bestseller from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Emperor of All Maladies—a fascinating history of the gene and “a magisterial account of how human minds have laboriously, ingeniously picked apart what makes us tick” (Elle). “Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee dazzled... More Info

#Republic

March 28, 2017 | 280 pages
As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views. It's no accident that on some occasions, people of different... More Info

The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge

February 28, 2017 | 112 pages
A forty-year tightening of funding for scientific research has meant that resources are increasingly directed toward applied or practical outcomes, with the intent of creating products of immediate value. In such a scenario, it makes sense to focus on the most identifiable and urgent problems,... More Info
$17.99

Forces of Nature

William Collins | March 9, 2017 | 288 pages
Sunday Times Bestseller A breathtaking and beautiful exploration of our planet, this groundbreaking book accompanies the BBC One TV series, providing the deepest answers to the simplest questions. 'What is motion?' 'Why is every snowflake different?' 'Why is life symmetrical?' To answer these and... More Info
$27.50

Not in Our Genes

January 10, 2017 | 322 pages
Three eminent scientists analyze the scientific, social, and political roots of biological determinism.  More Info
$22.99

Dark Territory

Simon & Schuster | March 28, 2017 | 352 pages
“An important, disturbing, and gripping history” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review), the never-before-told story of the computer scientists and the NSA, Pentagon, and White House policymakers who invent and employ cyber wars—where every country can be a major power player and every hacker a... More Info
$39.99

Heart of the Machine

March 7, 2017 | 320 pages
For Readers of Ray Kurzweil and Michio Kaku, a New Look at the Cutting Edge of Artificial Intelligence Imagine a robotic stuffed animal that can read and respond to a child s emotional state, a commercial that can recognize and change based on a customer s facial expression, or a company that can... More Info

Asteroid Hunters

Simon & Schuster/ TED | March 14, 2017 | 128 pages
For the first time, scientists could have the knowledge to prevent a natural disaster epic in scale—an asteroid hitting the earth and in this exciting, adventuresome book, Carrie Nugent explains how. What are asteroids, and where do they come from? And, most urgently: Are they going to hit the... More Info

All Your Friends Like This

September 1, 2015 | 304 pages
ALL YOUR FRIENDS LIKE THIS is a topical, punchy and provocative look at how social networks are taking over the news. How do you get your news? Chances are not from a newspaper or the TV - that's so old-school. If you're anything like the rest of us, you get it from Facebook or Twitter. The great... More Info

The Vaccine Race

Viking Adult | February 7, 2017 | 400 pages
The epic and controversial story of the development of the first widely used normal human cell-line and, through it, some of the world's most important vaccines In June 1962, a young biologist at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, Leonard Hayflick, using tissue extracted from an aborted fetus... More Info

Your Right to Privacy

Self-Counsel Press | May 17, 2016 | 144 pages
North American online participation now exceeds 70 per cent and it is growing, but there are hundreds of vulnerabilities in the way we publish, share and store our information. 'Your Right To Privacy' outlines in detail how to keep your information as safe as possible in an age of hacking, sharing... More Info

The Ecology of Attention

Polity | January 10, 2017 | 220 pages
Information overload, the shallows, weapons of mass distraction, the googlization of minds: countless commentators condemn the flood of images and information that dooms us to a pathological attention deficit. In this new book, cultural theorist Yves Citton goes against the tide of these standard... More Info
$37.00

Why Time Flies

Simon & Schuster | January 24, 2017 | 320 pages
“Time” is the most commonly used noun in the English language; it’s always on our minds and it advances through every living moment. But what is time, exactly? Do children experience it the same way adults do? Why does it seem to slow down when we’re bored and speed by as we get older? How... More Info

Reality Is Not What It Seems

Riverhead Books (Hardcover) | January 24, 2017 | 256 pages
From the New York Times-bestselling author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics, a closer look at the mind-bending nature of the universe. What are time and space made of? Where does matter come from? And what exactly is reality? Theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli has spent his whole life exploring... More Info

How to Clone a Mammoth

September 1, 2016 | 240 pages
Could extinct species, like mammoths and passenger pigeons, be brought back to life? The science says yes. "In How to Clone a Mammoth," Beth Shapiro, evolutionary biologist and pioneer in "ancient DNA" research, walks readers through the astonishing and controversial process of de-extinction. From... More Info

Chokepoints

November 29, 2016 | 320 pages
"In January 2012, millions participated in the now-infamous "Internet blackout" against the Stop Online Piracy Act, protesting the power it would have given intellectual property holders over the Internet. However, while SOPA's withdrawal was heralded as a victory for an open Internet, a small... More Info

Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat

November 8, 2016 | 288 pages
When the fuzzy indeterminacy of quantum mechanics overthrew the orderly world of Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein and Erwin Schr�dinger were at the forefront of the revolution. Neither man was ever satisfied with the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, however, and both rebelled against... More Info

Science of Managing

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Nights in Tents

Yucca Publishing | September 27, 2016 | 248 pages
From an acclaimed musician comes an inside look at one of the most controversial and influential civil rights movements of our time. Occupational Hazard is a memoir of the profoundly moving, and often hysterical, circumstances a fifty-one-year-old middle class musician encountered when she... More Info

The Science of Why

Simon & Schuster | November 1, 2016 | 224 pages
Ever wonder why onions make you cry? Or why lizards do pushups? Or why leaves change color in the fall? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Acclaimed science writer and broadcaster Jay Ingram wonders the same things. After a long career of asking important questions (Does time speed up as we age?... More Info

The World Made Meme

MIT Press | September 30, 2016 | 272 pages
How memetic media -- aggregate texts that are collectively created, circulated, and transformed -- become a part of public conversations that shape broader cultural debates.  More Info

The Content Trap

Random House | April 26, 2016 | 464 pages
For readers of "The Innovator s Dilemma" comes an incisive new approach to one of the key questions of our time how to thrive rather than be destroyed by digital transformation from Harvard Business School Professor of Strategy Bharat Anand. Companies everywhere face two major challenges today:... More Info

Driverless

Mit Press | September 2, 2016 | 328 pages
In the year 2014, Google fired a shot heard all the way to Detroit. Google's newest driverless car had no steering wheel and no brakes. The message was clear: cars of the future will be born fully autonomous, with no human driver needed. In the coming decade, self-driving cars will hit the streets,... More Info

Men, Machines, and Modern Times

Mit Press | August 19, 2016 | 344 pages
People have had trouble adapting to new technology ever since (perhaps) the inventor of the wheel had to explain that a wheelbarrow could carry more than a person. This little book by a celebrated MIT professor -- the fiftieth anniversary edition of a classic -- describes how we learn to live and... More Info

Streaming, Sharing, Stealing

MIT Press | August 5, 2016 | 232 pages
How big data is transforming the creative industries, and how those industries can use lessons from Netflix, Amazon, and Apple to fight back.  More Info

Life on the Edge

Broadway Books | July 26, 2016 | 368 pages
New York Times Bestseller and an Amazon Best Science Book of 2015 Life is the most extraordinary phenomenon in the known universe; but how did it come to be? Even in an age of cloning and artificial biology, the remarkable truth remains: nobody has ever made anything living entirely out of dead... More Info

Big Science

July 26, 2016 | 528 pages
"The birth of Big Science can be traced to Berkeley, California, nearly nine decades ago, when a resourceful young scientist with a talent for physics and an even greater talent for promotion pondered his new invention and declared, 'I'm going to be famous!' Ernest Orlando Lawrence's cyclotron... More Info

Big Farms Make Big Flu

Monthly Review Press | June 1, 2016 | 400 pages
Thanks to breakthroughs in production and food science, agribusiness has been able to devise new ways to grow more food and get it more places more quickly. There is no shortage of news items on hundreds of thousands of hybrid poultry – each animal genetically identical to the next – packed... More Info

The Wave

Random House Digital, Inc. | May 31, 2011 | 432 pages
A riveting and rollicking tour-de-force about the terrifying power of nature's most deadly phenomena — colossal waves — and the scientists and super surfers who are obsessed with them. The New York Timesbestselling author ofThe Devil's Teethprobes the dramatic convergence of baffling gargantuan... More Info

Pressed for Time

University of Chicago Press | June 6, 2016 | 227 pages
The technologically tethered, iPhone-addicted figure is an image we can easily conjure. Most of us complain that there aren't enough hours in the day and too many e-mails in our thumb-accessible inboxes. This widespread perception that life is faster than it used to be is now ingrained in our... More Info

AI

Oxford University Press | May 26, 2016 | 202 pages
The applications of Artificial Intelligence lie all around us; in our homes, schools and offices, in our cinemas, in art galleries and - not least - on the Internet. The results of Artificial Intelligence have been invaluable to biologists, psychologists, and linguists in helping to understand the... More Info

Pandemic

Macmillan | February 16, 2016 | 288 pages
"From the author of The Fever, a wide-ranging inquiry into the origins of pandemics Interweaving history, original reportage, and personal narrative, Pandemic explores the origins of epidemics, drawing parallels between the story of cholera-one of history's most disruptive and deadly pathogens-and... More Info

Sorting the Beef from the Bull

Bloomsbury Sigma | April 26, 2016 | 320 pages
Horse meat in our burgers, melamine in our infant formula, artificial colors in our fish and fruit--as our urban lifestyle takes us farther away from our food sources, there are increasing opportunities for dishonesty, duplicity, and profit-making shortcuts. Food adulteration, motivated by money,... More Info

The Gene

Scribner | May 17, 2016 | 592 pages
From the Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Emperor of All Maladies—a magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to “read” and “write” our own genetic information? The extraordinary... More Info

Magic and Loss

Simon & Schuster | January 26, 2016 | 256 pages
Just as Susan Sontag did for photography and Marshall McLuhan did for television, Virginia Heffernan (called one of the “best living writers of English prose”) reveals the logic and aesthetics behind the Internet. Since its inception, the Internet has morphed from merely an extension of... More Info

The Shallows

W. W. Norton & Company | December 12, 2017 | 276 pages
Expanding on an article that appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, the best-selling author of The Big Switch discusses the intellectual and cultural consequences of the Internet, and how it may be transforming our neural pathways for the worse.  More Info

Life

Harper Perennial | February 23, 2016 | 304 pages
The newest addition to John Brockman’s Edge.org series explores life itself, bringing together the world’s leading biologists, geneticists, and evolutionary theorists—including Richard Dawkins, Edward O. Wilson, J. Craig Venter, and Freeman Dyson. Scientists’ understanding of life is... More Info

Alphabetical

February 9, 2016 | 256 pages
How on Earth did we fix upon our twenty-six letters, what do they really mean, and how did we come to write them down in the first place? Michael Rosen takes you on an unforgettable adventure through the history of the alphabet in twenty-six vivid chapters, fizzing with personal anecdotes and... More Info

Most Wanted Particle

March 8, 2016 | 320 pages
The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large... More Info

The Soul of an Octopus

Atria Books | May 17, 2016 | 256 pages
Another New York Times bestseller from the author of The Good Good Pig, this “fascinating…touching…informative…entertaining” (Daily Beast) book explores the emotional and physical world of the octopus—a surprisingly complex, intelligent, and spirited creature—and the remarkable... More Info

The Next Species

Simon & Schuster | March 29, 2016 | 336 pages
“Simultaneously sobering and exhilarating, Michael Tennesen’s wide-ranging survey of disasters highlights both life’s fragility and its metamorphosing persistence” (Booklist) and describes what life on earth could look like after the next mass extinction. A growing number of scientists... More Info

Terms of Service

Harper Perennial | March 8, 2016 | 448 pages
Social networking has grown into a staple of modern society, but its continued evolution is becoming increasingly detrimental to our lives. Shifts in communication and privacy are affecting us more than we realize or understand.  More Info

Tales from Both Sides of the Brain

Ecco | January 26, 2016 | 448 pages
Michael S. Gazzaniga, one of the most important neuroscientists of the twentieth century, gives us an exciting behind-the-scenes look at his seminal work on that unlikely couple, the right and left brain. Foreword by Steven Pinker. In the mid-twentieth century, Michael S. Gazzaniga, “the father... More Info

Brain vs. Machine

Harper Perennial | October 6, 2015 | 528 pages
As the world becomes ever more dominated by technology, John Brockman’s latest addition to the acclaimed and bestselling “Edge Question Series” asks more than 175 leading scientists, philosophers, and artists: What do you think about machines that think? The development of artificial... More Info

Humanity in a Creative Universe

Oxford University Press | March 1, 2016 | 312 pages
Much of Stuart Kauffman's work in the philosophy of evolutionary biology has centered on the question of what he calls "prestatability" in evolution: that is, whether or not science can precisely predict the future development of biological features in organisms, using a singular "FinalTheory" of... More Info

The Second Machine Age

W. W. Norton | May 4, 2015 | 320 pages
A pair of technology experts describe how humans will have to keep pace with machines in order to become prosperous in the future and identify strategies and policies for business and individuals to use to combine digital processing power with human ingenuity.  More Info

Rust

Simon and Schuster | March 22, 2016 | 304 pages
It has been called "the great destroyer" and "the evil." The Pentagon refers to it as "the pervasive menace." Itdestroys cars, fells bridges, sinks ships, sparks house fires, and nearly brought down the Statue of Liberty. Rust costs America more than $400 billion per year-more than all other... More Info

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