Price Paid: The Fight for First Nations Survival with Bev Sellars

2016 06 Oct
7:00pm - 9:00pm
Price Paid: The Fight for First Nations Survival with Bev Sellars

Join award-winning author Bev Sellars to celebrate the launch of her highly anticipated new book, Price Paid: The Fight for First Nations Survival.

Following her groundbreaking debut, They Called Me Number One, Sellars untangles truth from some of the myths about First Nations and addresses misconceptions still widely believed today.

The second book by award-winning author Bev Sellars, Price Paid is based on a popular presentation Sellars often told to treaty-makers, politicians, policymakers, and educators.

The book begins with glimpses of foods, medicines, and cultural practices North America’s indigenous peoples have contributed to the rest of the world. It documents the dark period of regulation by racist laws during the twentieth century, and then discusses new emergence in the twenty-first century into a re-establishment of Indigenous land and resource rights. The result is a candidly told personal take on the history of Aboriginal rights in Canada and Canadian history told from a First Nations point of view.

7 PM
Thursday, October 6 2016
Octopus Books
@25One Community
251 Bank St. 2nd floor

General Admission: Pay What You Can

Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/351871931868216/.

About the Author

Bev Sellars was chief of the Xat’sull (Soda Creek) First Nation in Williams Lake, British Columbia, for more than 20 years, and she now serves as a member of its Council. Sellars returned to the First Nations community of Soda Creek after an extended period of “visiting other territories.” While she was away, she earned a degree in history from the University of Victoria and a law degree from the University of British Columbia, and she served as adviser for the B.C. Treaty Commission. She was first elected chief in 1987 and has spoken out on behalf of her community on racism and residential schools and on the environmental and social threats of mineral resource exploitation in her region.


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