Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling

Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling

March 1, 2014 | 360 pages

Three years before his death Michel Foucault gave a series of lectures at the Catholic University of Louvain that have remained relatively unknown until only recently. Entitled Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling, these lectures provides the missing link between Foucault's early work on sexuality and punishment and his later work on Greek and Roman antiquity. Ranging broadly from Homer to the 20th century, Foucault traces how the early ethical acts of truth-telling in ancient Greece gradually metamorphosed into acts of self-incrimination in monastic times and ultimately into the birth and rise of psychiatry as the foundation of modern penology, criminology, and criminal justice. For Foucault, self-incrimination no longer did the work necessary to quell justice because, by the 19th century, we wanted to know more than just the fact of wrongdoing, we wanted to know who the criminal was: not just whether the accused committed the crime, but what it was about him that made him commit the crime. An avowal of wrong-doing was no longer sufficient?psychiatric expertise was now necessary?and that development marks the birth of discipline and modern criminal justice made so famous by Foucault

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ISBN: 9780226257709

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